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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Sure

SURE, adjective shure. [Latin assevero, and to be connected with swear, and perhaps with Latin verus; s being the remains of a prefix.]

1. Certain; unfailing; infallible.

The testimony of the Lord is sure Psalms 19:7.

We have also a more sure word of prophecy. 2 Peter 1:10.

2. Certainly knowing, or having full confidence.

We are sure that the judgment of God is according to truth-- Romans 2:2.

Now we are sure that thou knowest all things. John 16:30.

3. Certain; safe; firm; permanent.

Thy kingdom shall be sure to thee. Daniel 4:26.

4. Firm; stable; steady; not liable to failure, loss or change; as a sure covenant. 2 Samuel 23:5. Nehemiah 9:38. Isaiah 28:16.

The Lord will make my lord a sure house. 1 Samuel 25:28.

So we say, to stand sure to be sure of foot.

5. Certain of obtaining or of retaining; as, to be sure of game; to be sure of success; to be sure of life or health.

6. Strong; secure; not liable to be broken or disturbed.

Go your way, make it as sure as ye can. Math.27.

7. Certain; not liable to failure. The income is sure

To be sure or be sure certainly. Shall you go? be sure I shall.

To make sure to make certain; to secure so that there can be no failure of the purpose or object.

Make sure of Cato.

A peace cannot fail, provided we make sure of Spain.

Give all diligence to make your calling and election sure 2 Peter 1:10.

SURE, adverb Certainly; without doubt; doubtless.

SURE the queen would wish him still unknown.

[But in this sense, surely is more generally used.]