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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Unite


UNI'TE, verb transitive [Latin unio, unitus.]

1. To put together or join two or more things, which make one compound or mixture. Thus we unite the parts of a building to make one structure. The kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland united, form one empire. So we unite spirit and water and other liquors. We unite strands to make a rope. The states of North America united, form one nation.

2. To join; to connect in a near relation or alliance; as, to unite families by marriage; to unite nations by treaty.

3. To make to agree or be uniform; as, to unite a kingdom in one form of worship; to unite men in opinions.

4. To cause to adhere; as, to unite bricks or stones by cement.

5. To join in interest or fellowship. Genesis 49:6.

6. To tie; to splice; as, to unite two cords or ropes.

7. To join in affection; to make near; as, to unite hearts in love.

To unite the heart, to cause all its powers and affections to join with order and delight in the same objects. Psalms 86:11.

UNI'TE, verb intransitive

1. To join in an act; to concur; to act in concert. All parties united in petitioning for a repeal of the law.

2. To coalesce; to be cemented or consolidated; to combine; as, bodies unite by attraction or affinity.

3. To grow together, as the parts of a wound.

The spur of a young cock grafted into the comb, will unite and grow.

4. To coalesce, as sounds.

5. To be mixed. Oil and water will not unite