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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Vent


VENT, noun [Latin venio, Eng. wind, etc.; properly a passage.]

1. A small aperture; a hole or passage for air or other fluid to escape; as the vent of a cask.

2. The opening in a cannon or other piece of artillery, by which fire is communicated to the charge.

3. Passage from secrecy to notice; publication.

4. The act of opening.

5. Emission; passage; escape from confinement; as, his smothered passions urge for vent

6. Discharge; utterance; means of discharge.

Had like grief been dew'd in tears, without the vent of words -;

7. Sale; as the vent of a thousand copies of a treatise.

8. Opportunity to sell; demand.

There is no vent for any commodity except wool.

9. An inn, a baiting place. [Not in use.]

To give vent to, to suffer to escape; to let out; to pour forth.

VENT, verb transitive

1. To let out at a small aperture.

2. To let out; to suffer to escape from confinement; to utter; to pour forth; as, to vent passion or complaint.

The queen of heav'n did thus her fury vent

3. To utter; to report. [Not in use.]

4. To publish.

The sectators did greatly enrich their inventions by venting the stolen treasures of divine letters. [Not used.]

5. To sell.

Therefore did those nations vent such spice. [Not in use.]

[Instead of vent in the latter sense, we use vend.

VENT, verb intransitive To snuff. [Not in use.]