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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Want


WANT, noun

1. Deficiency; defect; the absence of that which is necessary or useful; as a want of power or knowledge fro any purpose; want of food and clothing. The want of money is a common want 2 Corinthians 8:14, 9.

From having wishes in consequence of our wants, we often feel wants in consequence of our wishes.

2. Need; necessity; the effect of deficiency.

Pride is as loud a beggar as want and more saucy.

3. Poverty; penury; indigence.

Nothing is so hard for those who abound in riches as to conceive how others can be in want

4. The state of not having. I cannot write a letter at present for want of time.

5. That which is not possessed, but is desired or necessary for use or pleasure.

Habitual superfluities become actual wants.

6. A mole.

WANT, verb transitive waunt.

1. To be destitute; to be deficient in; not to have; a word of general application; as, to want knowledge; to want judgment; to want learning; to want food and clothing; to want money.

2. To be defective or deficient in. Timber may want strength or solidity to answer its purpose.

3. To fall short; not to contain or have. The sum want a dollar of the amount of debt.

Nor think, though men were none, that heaven would want spectators, God want praise.

4. To be without.

The unhappy never want enemies.

5. To need; to have occasion for, as useful, proper or requisite. Our manners want correction. In winter we want a fire; in summer we want cooling breezes. We all want more public spirit and more virtue.

6. To wish for; to desire. Every man wants a little pre-eminence over his neighbor. Many want that which they cannot obtain, and which if they could obtain, would certainly ruin them.

What wants my son?

WANT, verb intransitive waunt.

1. To be deficient; not to be sufficient.

As in bodies, thus in souls, we find what wants in blood and spirits, swelld with wind.

2. To fail; to be deficient; to be lacking.

No time shall find me wanting to my truth.

3. To be missed; not to be present. The jury was full, wanting one.

4. To fall short; to be lacking.

Twelve, wanting one, he slew.