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Webster's Dictionary 1828 - Online Edition

Webster's Dictionary 1828

Americal Dictionary of the English Language

American Dictionary
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Will

WILL, noun [See the Verb.]

1. That faculty of the mind by which we determine either to do or forbear an action; the faculty which is exercised in deciding, among two or more objects, which we shall embrace or pursue. The will is directed or influenced by the judgment. The understanding or reason compares different objects, which operate as motives; the judgment determines which is preferable, and the will decides which to pursue. In other words, we reason with respect to the value or importance of things; we then judge which is to be preferred; and we will to take the most valuable. These are but different operations of the mind, soul, or intellectual part of man. Great disputes have existed respecting the freedom of the will will is often quite a different thing from desire.

A power over a mans subsistence, amounts to a power over his will

2. Choice; determination. It is my will to prosecute the trespasser.

3. Choice; discretion; pleasure.

Go, then, the guilty at thy will chastise.

4. Command; direction.

Our prayers should be according to the will of God.

5. Disposition; inclination; desire. What is your will Sir? In this phrase, the word may also signify determination, especially when addressed to a superior.

6. Power; arbitrary disposal.

Deliver me not over to the will of my enemies. Psalms 27:3.

7. Divine determination; moral purpose or counsel.

Thy will be done. Lords Prayer.

8. Testament; the disposition of a mans estate, to take effect after his death. Wills are written, or nuncupative, that is, verbal.

Good will

1. Favor; kindness.

2. Right intention. Philippians 1:6.

Ill will enmity; unfriendliness. It expresses less than malice.

To have ones will to obtain what is desired.

At will To hold an estate at the will of another, is to enjoy the possession at his pleasure, and be liable to be ousted at any time by the lessor or proprietor.

WILL with a wisp, Jack with a lantern; ignis fatuus; a luminous appearance sometimes seen in the air over moist ground, supposed to proceed from hydrogen gas.

WILL, verb transitive [G., Latin , Gr. The sense is to set, or to set forward, to stretch forward. The sense is well expressed by the Latin ]

1. To determine; to decide int he mind that something shall be done or forborne; implying power to carry the purpose into effect. In this manner God wills whatever comes to pass. So in the style of princes; we will that execution be done.

A man that sits still is said to be at liberty, because he can walk if he will it.

2. To command; to direct.

Tis yours, O queen! To will the work which duty bids me to fulfill.

3. To be inclined or resolved to have.

There, there, Hortensio, will you any wife?

4. To wish; to desire. What will you?

5. To dispose of estate and effects by testament.

6. It is sometimes equivalent to may be. Let the circumstances be what they will; that is, any circumstances, of whatever nature.

7. will is used as an auxiliary verb, and a sign of the future tense. It has different signification in different persons.

1. I will go, is a present promise to go; and with an emphasis on will it expresses determination.

2. Thou wilt go, you will go, express foretelling; simply stating an event that is to come.

3. He will go, is also a foretelling. The use of will in the plural, is the same. We will promises; ye will they will foretell.