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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Window


WINDOW, noun [ G. The vulgar pronunciation is windor, as if from the Welsh gwyntdor, wind-door.]

1. An opening in the wall of a building for the admission of light, and of air when necessary. This opening has a frame on the sides, in which are set movable sashes, containing panes of glass. In the United Sates, the sashes are made to rise and fall, for the admission or exclusion of air. In France, windows are shut with frames or sashes that open and shut vertically, like the leaves of a folding door.

2. An aperture or opening.

A window shalt thou make to the ark. Genesis 6:16.

3. The frame or other thing that covers the aperture.

Ere I let fall the windows of mine eyes.

4. An aperture; or rather the clouds or water-spouts.

The windows of heaven were opened. Genesis 7:11.

5. Lattice or casement; or the network of wire used before the invention of glass. Judges 5:28.

6. Lines crossing each other.

Till he has windows on his bread and butter.

WINDOW, verb transitive

1. To furnish with windows.

2. To place at a window [Unusual.]

3. To break into openings. [Unusual.]