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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Wring


WRING, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive wringed and wrung. The latter is chiefly used.

1. To twist; to turn and strain with violence; as, to wring clothes in washing.

2. To squeeze; to press; to force by twisting; as, to wring water out of a wet garment.

3. To writhe; as, to wring the body in pain.

4. TO pinch.

The king began to find where his shoe did wring him.

If he had not been too much grieved and wrung by an uneasy and strait fortune--

5. To distress; to press with pain.

Didst thou taste but half the griefs, that wring my soul, thou couldst not talk thus coldly.

6. To distort; to pervert.

How dare these men thus wring the Scriptures?

7. To persecute with extortion.

These merchant adventurers have been often wronged and wringed to the quick.

8. To bend or strain out of its positions, as, to wring a mast.

To wring off, to force off or separate by wringing; as, to wring off the head of a fowl.

To wring out,

1. To force out; to squeeze out by twisting; as, to wring out dew or water. Judges 6:38.

2. To free from a liquor by wringing; as, to wring out clothes.

To wring from, to force from by violence; to extort; as revenues wrung from the poor; to wring from one his rights; to wring a secret from one.

WRING, verb intransitive To writhe; to twist; as with anguish.

WRING, noun Action of anguish.