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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Yard


YARD, noun

1. A measure of three feet or thirty six inches. It is just seven niths of the Paris ell.

2. An inclosure; usually, a small inclosed place in front of or around a house or barn. The yard in front of a house is called a court, and sometimes a court-yard. In the United States, a small yard is fenced round a barn for confining cattle, and called barn-yard or cow-yard.

3. In ships, a long slender piece of timber, nearly cylindrical, suspended upon the mast, by which a sail is extended.

YARD of land, in old books, a certain quantity of land, but different in different countries. In some counties it was 15 acres, in others 20 or 24, and even 40.

Dock-yard, a place where ships are laid up.

Prison yard primarily an inclosure about a prison, or attached to it. Hence liberty of the yard is a liberty granted to persons imprisoned for debt, of walking in the yard or within any other limits prescribed by the law, on his giving bond not to go beyond those limits.

YARD, verb transitive To confine cattle to the yard; as, to yard cows. [A farmers word.]