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American Dictionary of the English Language

Webster's Dictionary 1828

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Yield


YIELD, verb transitive

1. To produce, as land, stock or funds; to give in return for labor, or as profit. Lands yield not more than three per cent annually; houses yield four or five percent. Maiz on good land, yields two or three hundred fold.

2. To produce, in general. Most vegetable juices yield a salt.

3. To afford; to exhibit. The flowers in spring yield a beautiful sight.

4. To allow; to concede; to admit to be true; as, to yield the point in debate. We yield that there is a God.

5. To give, as claimed of right; as, to yield due honors; to yield due praise.

6. To permit; to grant.

Life is but air, that yields a passage to the whistling sword.

7. To emit; to give up. To yield the breath, is to expire.

8. To resign; to give up; sometimes with up or over; as, to yield up their own opinions. We yield the place to our superiors.

9. To surrender; sometimes with up; as, to yield a fortress to the enemy; or to yield up a fortress.

YIELD, verb intransitive

1. To give up the contest; to submit.

He saw the fainting Grecians yield

2. To comply with; as, I yielded to his request.

3. To give way; not to oppose. We readily yield to the current of opinion; we yield to customs and fashions.

4. To give place, as inferior in rank or excellence. They will yield to us in nothing.

Tell me in what more happy fields the thistle springs, to which the lily yields?