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American Dictionary of the English Language

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Mine


MINE, adjective called sometimes a pronominal adj. [Latin meus.]

My; belonging to me. It was formerly used before nouns beginning with vowels. 'I kept myself from mine iniquity.' Psalms 18:3. But this use is no longer retained. We now use my before a vowel as well as before an articulation; as my iniquity. In present usage, my always precedes the noun, and mine follows the noun, and usually the verb; as, this is my book; this book is mine; it is called my book; the book is called mine:it is acknowledged to be mine

MINE sometimes supplies the place of a noun. Your sword and mine are different in construction.

MINE, noun

1. A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic ores, mineral substances and other fossil bodies are taken by digging. The pits from which stones only are taken, are called quarries.

2. In the military art, a subterraneous canal or passage dug under the wall or rampart of a fortification, where a quantity of power may be lodged for blowing up the works.

3. A rich source of wealth or other good.

MINE, verb intransitive To dig a mine or pit in the earth.

1. To form a subterraneous canal or hole by scratching; to form a burrow or lodge in the earth, as animals; as the mining coney.

2. To practice secret means in injury.

MINE, verb transitive To sap; to undermine; to dig away or otherwise remove the substratum or foundation; hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.

They mined the walls.

In a metaphorical sense, undermine is generally used.